Some great news for all the astronomy fans out there, as this weekend a moon brighter than ever will be visible on the sky. The breathtaking orange spectacle will start after the sunset on October 13th, and the exact time of the full moon will be 22:07 pm GMT, the Country Living reports.

“The October full moon will happen on the 13th and is known as the Hunter’s Moon. The Moon will rise just after sunset, at 18:35 and will be highest in the sky around midnight,” Tania de Sales Marques, astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich told Country Living. “If you go for a walk after dinner and the skies are clear, face south and you should be able to spot a beautiful full moon.”

 

 

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Here’s the beautiful Harvest Moon, shot during our balmy September heatwave. I’ve been previsualizing this shot for years and I’m so happy it all finally came together! As the moon rose, a coyote chorus started up in the distance, joining the music of the buoy bells just offshore. Hoooooowl indeed! 🌕🌆🌉🐺

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According to NASA, the name of “Hunter’s Moon,” came from ancient times and it means the starting of the hunting season. It occurs at the time of the year when the leaves have fallen and time to hunt begins. “This name is thought to date back to early European and Native American tribes who would associate October’s full moon with the season for hunting game and preparing for the winter months,” Tania de Sales explained.

As about the reason of why the moon will look so big on that night, Bob Berman, astronomer at the Farmer’s Almanac told the LADBible: “When the moon is high overhead, it is dwarfed by the vast hemisphere of the heavens and appears to our eyes as a small disk in the sky.

“By contrast, when the moon is low, it is viewed in relation to earthly objects, such as chimneys or trees, whose size and shape provide scale. Your brain compares the size of the moon to the trees, buildings or other reference points, and suddenly, the moon looks massive,” Berman said.

It’s time to call your astronomy friends. And lets’s hope it won’t be a cloudy night!